Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBatt, Rosemary
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T17:14:11Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T17:14:11Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-01
dc.identifier.other7131249
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/74875
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] Bruce Kaufman has produced two volumes on the early development of human resource (HR) management that should become mainstays in undergraduate and graduate courses in the fields of HR studies and industrial relations. Not since Sandy Jacoby's pathbreaking book on the development of personnel management has such careful attention been paid to the inner workings of American corporations' personnel policies a century ago (Employing Bureaucracy: Managers, Unions and the Transforming of Work in American Industry, 1900-1945, 1985). Unlike Jacoby, who specifically analyzed how and why companies developed these policies in response to union movements and external pressures, Kaufman's purpose is to show that the roots of "modern" HR management can be traced to the late nineteenth and that “strategic” HR is not new.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © Cornell University. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
dc.subjecthuman resource studies
dc.subjectstrategic human resource management
dc.subjectemployee relations
dc.title[Review of the books 'Managing the Human Factor: The Early Years of Human Resource Management in American Industry and 'Hired Hands or Human Resources? Case Studies of HRM Programs and Practices in Early American Industry']
dc.typeunassigned
dc.description.legacydownloadsBatt92_Review_of_Managing_the_human_factor.pdf: 427 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBatt, Rosemary: rb41@cornell.edu Cornell University


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics