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dc.contributor.authorBlalock, Garrick
dc.contributor.authorDeVaro, Jed
dc.contributor.authorLeventhal, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Daniel H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T16:58:09Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T16:58:09Z
dc.date.issued2007-02-22
dc.identifier.other344095
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/74713
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] We test for the existence of gender bias in power relationships. Specifically, we examine whether police officers are less likely to issue traffic tickets to men or to women during traffic stops. Whereas the conventional wisdom, which we document with surveys, is that women are less likely to receive tickets, our analysis shows otherwise. Examination of a pooled sample of traffic stops from five locations reveals no gender bias, but does show significant regional variation in the likelihood of citations. Analysis by location shows that women are more likely to receive citations in three of the five locations. Men are more likely to receive citations in the other two locations. To our knowledge, this study is the first to test for gender bias in traffic stops, and clearly refutes the conventional wisdom that police are more lenient towards women.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectbias
dc.subjectpower
dc.subjectpolice
dc.subjecttraffic
dc.subjectcitations
dc.subjecttickets
dc.titleGender Bias in Power Relationships: Evidence from Police Traffic Stops
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsDevaro2_Gender_Bias_in_Power_Relationships_Evidence_from_Police.pdf: 3066 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBlalock, Garrick: gb78@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationDeVaro, Jed: jld48@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationLeventhal, Stephanie: sil3@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationSimon, Daniel H.: dhs29@cornell.edu Cornell University


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