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dc.contributor.authorSlater, Joseph E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-13T18:58:17Z
dc.date.available2020-11-13T18:58:17Z
dc.date.issued2004-01-01
dc.identifier.other100030
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/74202
dc.descriptionThe abstract, table of contents, and first twenty-five pages are published with permission from the Cornell University Press. For ordering information, please visit the Cornell University Press at http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/.
dc.description.abstractFrom the dawn of the twentieth century to the early 1960s, public-sector unions generally had no legal right to strike, bargain, or arbitrate, and government workers could be fired simply for joining a union. Public Workers is the first book to analyze why public-sector labor law evolved as it did, separate from and much more restrictive than private-sector labor law, and what effect this law had on public-sector unions, organized labor as a whole, and by extension all of American politics. The author shows how public-sector unions survived, represented their members, and set the stage for the most remarkable growth of worker organization in American history.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectpublic
dc.subjectworker
dc.subjectunion
dc.subjectlaw
dc.subjectstate
dc.subjectgovernment
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectlabor
dc.subjectsector
dc.subjectprivate
dc.subjectAFL
dc.titlePublic Workers: Government Employee Unions, the Law, and the State, 1900–1962
dc.typebook chapter
dc.description.legacydownloadsPublicWorkers.pdf: 3386 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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