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dc.contributor.authorHausknecht, John
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T21:17:05Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T21:17:05Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-01
dc.identifier.other10669393
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73700
dc.description.abstract[Excerpt] In large organizations, mid-level unit leaders regularly vacate their positions for a variety of reasons, including promotions, transfers, quits, and terminations. Certainly there are reasons to expect that these departures have residual effects – both positive and negative – on the units involved. Surprisingly, though, researchers have thus far paid scant attention to these dynamics. The present study takes a major step toward filling this void. Specifically, it looks at data from 287 locations of a company in the food and hospitality industry to examine the extent to which succession patterns among mid-level unit leaders influence both short- and longer-term voluntary turnover rates among core employees in the affected entities.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjecthuman resources
dc.subjectHR
dc.subjectleader
dc.subjectleadership development
dc.subjecttalent management
dc.subjectturnover
dc.subjectdepartures
dc.subjectvoluntary turnover
dc.subjectHR operations
dc.subjectunit leader
dc.subjectdata
dc.subjecttraining
dc.subjectreplacement leaders
dc.subjectlearning
dc.subjecthigh performing unit leaders
dc.subjectinternal replacements
dc.subjectexternal replacements
dc.titleHow do Leader Departures Affect Turnover Among Those Employees Left Behind?
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsNo4_17_ResearchLink_Hausknecht.pdf: 1000 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationHausknecht, John: jph42@cornell.edu Cornell University


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