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dc.contributor.authorCenter for Advanced Human Resource Studies, ILR School, Cornell University
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T21:16:57Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T21:16:57Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-01
dc.identifier.other1167791
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73669
dc.description.abstractKey Findings: • As rates of voluntary turnover climb within key business units, customers are more likely to report bad customer service. • When new workers arrive, established workers have to take time away from customer service to train the new workers in procedures and company culture. • Work units with lots of new employees have more trouble managing turnover and receive the lowest customer service ratings. • Bigger may not be better—larger work units have particular difficulty managing turnover and receive lower customer service scores than smaller ones. • A tight, cohesive work group seems to suffer from turnover as much as a less-bonded group.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectemployee engagement
dc.subjectturnover
dc.subjectretention
dc.subjectcommitment
dc.subjectperformance management
dc.titleCustomers Suffer From Employee Churn: High Turnover Makes It Harder to Provide Top Service
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsNo1_09ResearchLink_TurnoverServiceJH.pdf: 399 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationCenter for Advanced Human Resource Studies, ILR School, Cornell University.: True


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