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dc.contributor.authorMacKeller, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorMagavern, Sam
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T20:49:49Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T20:49:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-03
dc.identifier.other10896292
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73521
dc.description.abstractConventional wisdom in the United States holds that our health care system, while costly, achieves some of the best outcomes in the world. A report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), however, conclusively refutes these assumptions. In a survey of current and historical health data for 17 other high-income democracies, the IOM found that the United States ranked dead last in life expectancy among males and second-to-last among females, despite spending substantially more per person on health care than any other nation. In measure after measure, Americans were found to have poorer health and higher rates of disease compared to their peer-country counterparts.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectBuffalo
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectHealth Insurance
dc.subjectPolicy Brief
dc.subjectPPG
dc.titleWhy New York State Still Needs Single Payer Health Care
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsHealth__Why_New_York_State_Still_Needs_Single_Payer_Health_Care.pdf: 26 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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