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dc.contributor.authorRaleigh, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T20:49:42Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T20:49:42Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-17
dc.identifier.other10875577
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73505
dc.description.abstractThe City of Buffalo has made strides in recent years to make urban farming an accepted use of vacant land. However, the fact remains that the City is unwilling to “take risks” in this area. There are a number of policies that restrict the freedom of farmers to get access to land, gain long term land security, grow a diversity of foods (including animals), and sell the food. In order for farming to really take hold and have a transformative effect on the local food system and economy, the City should amend these policies to allow farmers more freedom. The City can also promote farming with a city-wide composting program and a demolition policy that requires vacant lots to be seeded with clover.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectBuffalo
dc.subjectEnvironment
dc.subjectFood
dc.subjectLand Use
dc.subjectParks/Gardens/Green Spaces
dc.subjectPolicy Brief
dc.subjectPPG
dc.titleHow City Hall Can Foster the Urban Farming Revolution in Buffalo
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsEnvironment__Urban_Farming.pdf: 21 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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