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dc.contributor.authorFitzsimmons, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T20:48:41Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T20:48:41Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-02
dc.identifier.other10897000
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73322
dc.description.abstractCampaign finance laws govern how political candidates raise and spend monies for their elections. In general, there are three ways in which states regulate campaign finance: (1) disclosure, (2) contribution limits, and (3) public financing. Disclosure requires a candidate to disclose campaign-related contribution receipts as well as expenditures. Expenditures can include anything from advertising material to travel expenses. Contribution Limits restrict the amount of money that an individual or other entity (corporation, partnership, etc.) can contribute to a candidate or political party. Public Financing can take many forms, but, generally speaking, it is a voluntary program that allows a candidate to receive public money in exchange for abiding by spending and fundraising limits.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectBuffalo
dc.subjectGovernment
dc.subjectElections
dc.subjectFact Sheet
dc.subjectPPG
dc.subjectHousing/Neighborhoods
dc.titleNew York State Campaign Finance Laws
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsGovernment__New_York_State_Campaign_Finance_Laws.pdf: 43 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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