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dc.contributor.authorKing, Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T20:48:36Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T20:48:36Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-17
dc.identifier.other10928064
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73302
dc.description.abstractFor generations, cars have been cool because they are perceived to correlate to independence and wealth. People’s attachment to their cars is one of the most cited examples of why government doesn’t want to invest in mass transit. Accompanying this ideology is an underlying fear and distaste for buses. Recently, Cleveland purposely avoided such a stigma in naming its new bus line “The Health Line” and referring to it always as rapid transit. Yet, providing “cool” features to buses, like making them hybrid or dressing them up like quaint trolleys, has been largely unsuccessful in overhauling the image of buses. Buses aren’t cool. Yet.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectBuffalo
dc.subjectEnvironment
dc.subjectTransit
dc.subjectReport
dc.subjectPPG
dc.subjectPoverty/Income Inequality
dc.titleCooling Global Warming Through Transit
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsEnvironment__Cooling_Global_Warming_Through_Transit.pdf: 8 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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