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dc.contributor.authorPendall, Rolf
dc.contributor.authorDrennan, Matthew P.
dc.contributor.authorChristopherson, Susan
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T20:48:16Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T20:48:16Z
dc.date.issued2004-01-01
dc.identifier.other10937295
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73232
dc.description.abstractDuring the 1900s, the U.S. transitioned from an economy based largely on manufacturing to one in which almost all jobs are in services. This transition has rearranged the economic fortunes of regions throughout the nation: Locations in the Sunbelt and on both coasts prospered in the 1970s as traditional manufacturing centers in the Midwest declined. But such “rust belt” states as Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan rebounded in the late 1980s and early 1990s as the hemorrhage of manufacturing jobs abated and service-sector and finance jobs surged. While their recovery has not returned these states to the preeminence they enjoyed in the 1960s, it has disproved many forecasts of inevitable decline for the nation’s industrial heartland.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectBuffalo
dc.subjectEconomic Development
dc.subjectGeneral
dc.subjectReport
dc.subjectOther
dc.subjectPoverty/Income Inequality
dc.subjectData/Demographics/History
dc.subjectEquality/Civil Rights
dc.titleTransition and Renewal: The Emergence of a Diverse Upstate Economy
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsEconomicDevelopment__Transition_and_Renewal_The_Emergence_of_a_Diverse_Upstate_Economy.pdf: 43 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.


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