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dc.contributor.authorCowie, Jefferson
dc.contributor.authorHeathcott, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T19:32:37Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T19:32:37Z
dc.date.issued2003-01-01
dc.identifier.other152751
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73141
dc.description.abstract"The point of departure for any discussion of deindustrialization must be respect for the despair and betrayal felt by workers as their mines, factories, and mills were padlocked, abandoned, turned into artsy shopping spaces, or even dynamited. While economists and business leaders often speak in neutral, even hopeful, terms such as "restructuring," "downsizing," or "creative destruction," metaphors of defeat and subjugation are more appropriate for the workers who banked on good-paying industrial jobs for the livelihoods of their families and their communities."
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: Posted with permission of the ILR Press, an imprint of Cornell University Press.
dc.subjectdeindustrialization
dc.subjectjob
dc.subjectindustry
dc.subjectAmerica
dc.subjectpolitics
dc.subjectmanufacturing
dc.subjectplant
dc.subjectemploy
dc.subjectshutdown
dc.subjectU.S.
dc.subjectlabor
dc.subjecthistory
dc.titleThe Meanings of Deindustrialization
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsCowie_7_The_Meaning_of_Deindustrialization.pdf: 6959 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationCowie, Jefferson: jrc32@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationHeathcott, Joseph: Saint Louis University


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