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dc.contributor.authorKuruvilla, Sarosh
dc.contributor.authorErickson, Christopher L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T19:32:36Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T19:32:36Z
dc.date.issued2002-04-01
dc.identifier.other186338
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/73138
dc.description.abstractAuthors argue that industrial relations systems change due to shifts in the constraints facing those systems, and that the most salient constraints facing IR systems in Asia have shifted from those of maintaining labor peace and stability in the early stages of industrialization, to those of increasing both numerical and functional flexibility in the 1980s and 1990s. The evidence to sustain the argument is drawn from seven “representative” Asian IR systems: Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, India, and China. They also distinguish between systems that have smoothly adapted (Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines) and systems that have fundamentally transformed (China and South Korea), and hypothesize about the reasons for this difference.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statment: Copyright by Blackwell Publishing. Final paper published as Kuruvilla, S., Erickson, C.L., (2002). Change and Transformation in Asian Industrial Relations. Industrial Relations, 41, 171-228.
dc.subjectindustrial relations
dc.subjectindustrialization
dc.subjectIR
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectSouth Korea
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectMalaysia
dc.subjectPhilippines
dc.subjectIndia
dc.subjectChina
dc.titleChange and Transformation in Asian Industrial Relations
dc.typearticle
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/1468-232X.00243
dc.description.legacydownloadsChange_and_Transformation_in_Asian.pdf: 3750 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationKuruvilla, Sarosh: sck4@cornell.edu Cornell University
local.authorAffiliationErickson, Christopher L.: UCLA Anderson School of Management


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