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dc.contributor.authorMcFadden, J.W.
dc.contributor.authorMyers, W.A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-15T13:49:24Z
dc.date.available2020-10-15T13:49:24Z
dc.date.issued2020-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/72898
dc.descriptionPresented at 2020 Virtual Cornell Nutrition Conferenceen_US
dc.description.abstractThe gastrointestinal degradation of choline, betaine, and carnitine results in the formation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in humans and dairy cows. In humans, TMAO has emerged as an associative biomarker for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes; however, conflicting data is emerging. This presentation will explore the role of TMAO, the effect of diet on the gut microbiome in relation to TMAO formation, and new work focused on the effects or lack thereof in dairy cows.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Animal Scienceen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectCholineen_US
dc.subjectDairyen_US
dc.subjectHuman healthen_US
dc.subjectTrimethylamine N-oxideen_US
dc.titleTrimethylamine N-oxide in Humans and Dairy Cows: Should We Be Concerned?en_US
dc.typeconference papers and proceedingsen_US


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