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dc.contributor.authorD. Frank, Lawrence
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-12T14:53:21Z
dc.date.available2020-10-12T14:53:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-25
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/72866
dc.descriptionWebinaren_US
dc.description.abstractNew evidence linking built and natural environment features with physical activity, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stress, and sense of community will be presented. These finding are based on large scale health surveillance databases (40,000-50000 N) with address information spatially linked with detailed measures of regional transportation accessibility, walkability metrics, and green space. Results have been integrated into decision-support scenario planning tools (California and National Public Health Assessment Models) designed to predict health impacts of contrasting land use and transportation investment proposals at the neighborhood, corridor, and regional scale.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Department of Transportationen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleWhere Matters: Health and Economic Impacts of Where We Liveen_US
dc.typevideo/moving imageen_US
schema.accessibilityFeaturecaptionsen_US
schema.accessibilityHazardunknownen_US


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