Now showing items 21-40 of 44

    • American Ideals 31. Religion in Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Utopians’ religious beliefs are again touched upon by Professor Konvitz. Those who did not share these views could not hold public office and could not discuss their alternative views in public but were encouraged to do ...
    • American Ideals 24. The Stoics, Part 1 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The importance of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius and his Meditations in developing Stoic philosophy, religion, and a way of life are discussed. Understanding the true self, standing apart from the effect of society and ...
    • American Ideals 27. The Stoics, Part 4 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The Stoics’ basic principles as explained by Dr. Konvitz are defined as including the obligations implied by the Stoic concept of self, the cosmopolitan idea of a single humanity, the existence of a common moral law, the ...
    • American Ideals 28. Thomas More 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      More’s life in connection to Henry V’s dissolution of the English Catholic Church and Henry’s assumption of the supreme leadership of the subsequent Anglican Church is discussed. Thomas More’s trial for treason for this ...
    • American Ideals 30. Reform in Utopia 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz suggests that More is almost modern in his approach to the social problems he identifies. Utopians advocated common education and common work experiences for every man as a way of achieving recognition ...
    • American Ideals 25. The Stoics, Part 2 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      For Stoics, the real man is the internal man. The real man must be indifferent to what is external to him. True Stoics, Professor Konvitz explains, acted in accordance with virtue and knowledge regardless of their personal ...
    • American Ideals 09. Viewing Time, Part 2 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The Christian acceptance of linear time and history was challenged by contemporary Greek philosophers who held to the cyclical view. The problem that this view of history held for the Church was simply that if time and ...
    • American Ideals 08. Viewing Time, Part 1 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The concepts of biblical time and history were unique in the ancient world and were adopted by western civilization. In the Hebrew Bible, there is a straight line of movement from the story of creation, Adam, Abraham and ...
    • American Ideals 06. Good and Evil, Part 1 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The power of evil in the world is evident from the very beginning of the Bible, Professor Konvitz acknowledges. Biblical man responds to evil with the hope that it will be defeated and virtue vindicated. A righteous man ...
    • American Ideals 13. Man in society 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The Judaic-Christian concepts of human responsibility to self and especially to society and their biblical roots are discussed at length. Professor Konvitz elucidates the similarities of Jewish and Catholic viewpoints on ...
    • American Ideals 12. Freedom 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz responds to student questions about the apparent contradiction between the omnipotence of God and the concept of human freedom. Man is free but always judged, he suggests. This judgment is rendered only ...
    • American Ideals 22. Alexander the Great 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Professor Konvitz sets Alexander in his historical context as the greatest conqueror in human history. Alexander spread Greek culture and learning throughout his empire by establishing garrisons and cities that stretched ...
    • American Ideals 07. Good and Evil, Part 2 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Responding to a student question, Professor Konvitz explains the complexity of biblical analysis. The biblical presumption of human free will and its implications is then discussed as is the meaning of the story of Adam ...
    • American Ideals 11. Responsibility 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The concepts of resurrection and immortality intensified the belief in the uniqueness of the individual and their responsibility for themselves. This belief in humanity’s free will is the foundation for the belief in human ...
    • American Ideals 21. Antigone 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      In its discussion of civil law versus higher law, Sophocles’ play expounds on the basic principles that define humanity and reflect human’s godly qualities.
    • American Ideals 05. Dignity and Job 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      The biblical root of the concept of human dignity is explained. The Bible presumes a moral order in the universe and moral judgment. If, the Bible suggests, we obey God’s commandments, then we shall live; if we serve other ...
    • American Ideals 04. The Nature of Reality 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Our relation to God and God’s judgment is, for the man of faith, the realm of truth. Mere appearance is the realm of ignorance and falsehood. The Greek philosophers, Dr. Konvitz explains, also saw the distinction as being ...
    • American Ideals 36. Religion 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Locke’s views on religious toleration are a “tremendously important contribution” on this subject, which anticipated the First Amendment to the Constitution and subsequent Supreme Court decisions. Professor Konvitz argues ...
    • American Ideals 41. Emerson's Evil 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      To understand William James’s pluralism, suggests Professor Konvitz, one must understand the influence of Emerson’s view of evil. Emerson postulates that every evil is utilized in some way for good, and there is an ...
    • American Ideals 38. Revolution 

      Konvitz, Milton R. (1973)
      Revolution occurs when the grievances of the people are very great. A sovereign and a legislature rule by the trust of the people, Locke maintained, and when such trust is broken, revolution should result. Underlying Locke’s ...