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dc.contributor.authorBrownell, Judi
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-12T21:11:34Z
dc.date.available2020-09-12T21:11:34Z
dc.date.issued1990-09-01
dc.identifier.other10894976
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/72314
dc.description.abstractListening is a vital management skill. To find out more about how managers’ listening is perceived in an organizational context, researchers administered a questionnaire to 144 managers and 827 of their subordinates in 6 hospitality organizations. Managers were asked to rate 26 of their own listening behaviors using a 7-point scale. Subordinates were asked to indicate their perceptions of their managers’ listening behavior on each of the same 26 items. Profiles are presented of those managers who were perceived as particularly “good” or particularly “poor” listeners according to the ratings given them by their subordinates. Characteristics of those employees who gave their managers the highest and lowest ratings are also described. This information contributes to a better understanding of how managers’ listening is perceived in organizational contexts.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © SAGE. Final version published as: Brownell, J. (1990). Perceptions of effective listeners: A management study. International Journal of Business Communication, 27(4), 401-415. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectmanagerial communication
dc.subjectlistening
dc.subjectsurvey
dc.subjectemployee perceptions
dc.subjectorganizational behavior
dc.titlePerceptions of Effective Listeners: A Management Study
dc.typearticle
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/002194369002700405
dc.description.legacydownloadsBrownell47_Perceptions.pdf: 452 downloads, before Aug. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationBrownell, Judi: jlb18@cornell.edu Cornell University School of Hotel Administration


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