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dc.contributor.authorLynn, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-12T21:11:15Z
dc.date.available2020-09-12T21:11:15Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-30
dc.identifier.other8931942
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/72295
dc.description.abstractA survey of several hundred restaurant servers in the United States found that servers’ attitudes toward working for tips and average tip sizes were weakly related (at best) to their service-orientation, intended job-tenure, and occupational-tenure. These findings suggest that tipping does not substantially help to attract and retain more service-oriented workers. Restaurateurs can eliminate tipping at their restaurants without fear that doing so will reduce the quality of their wait-staff.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © Routledge. Final version published as: Lynn, W. M. (2016). Does tipping help to attract and retain better service workers? Journal of Foodservice Business Research. doi: 10.1080/15378020.2016.1195218. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
dc.subjecttipping
dc.subjectcompensation
dc.subjectturnover
dc.subjectoccupational choice
dc.titleDoes Tipping Help to Attract and Retain Better Service Workers?
dc.typearticle
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1080/15378020.2016.1195218
dc.description.legacydownloadsLynn102_Does_tipping.pdf: 515 downloads, before Aug. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationLynn, Michael: wml3@cornell.edu Cornell University


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