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dc.contributor.authorPingitore, Regina
dc.contributor.authorSeldin, Dan
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Arianne
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-10T18:38:13Z
dc.date.available2020-09-10T18:38:13Z
dc.date.issued2010-07-01
dc.identifier.other7459930
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/71306
dc.descriptionRussian language version included.
dc.description.abstractDespite the conventional wisdom that measuring customer satisfaction makes good business sense, there is a small but growing point of view that such measurements provide little or no actionable information to drive business outcomes.1 In contrast to that view, as we explain here, it is our position that companies should never stop measuring customer satisfaction, and instead they should take the necessary steps to ensure that measures of customer satisfaction are designed to provide the full benefit possible from such research.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © Cornell University. This report may not be reproduced or distributed without the express permission of the publisher.
dc.subjectCornell
dc.subjecthospitality
dc.subjectCisco
dc.subjectmeeting technology
dc.subjectvirtual
dc.subjectrussian
dc.titleMaking Customer Satisfaction Pay: Connecting Survey Data to Financial Outcomes in the Hotel Industry
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloads2010_Pingitore_Making_customer_satisfaction.pdf: 440 downloads, before Aug. 1, 2020.
dc.description.legacydownloads0-2010_Pingitore_Making_customer_satisfaction.pdf: 941 downloads, before Aug. 1, 2020.


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