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dc.contributor.authorMoulton, Pamela
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-10T15:26:38Z
dc.date.available2020-09-10T15:26:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-14
dc.identifier.other9266223
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/70991
dc.description.abstractMost hospitality firms do not consider managing stock portfolios to be a main part of their operations. They are in the service business, using their real assets and the services provided by employees to create valuable experiences for guests. However, the need to focus on stock investments arises through those employees. Employees consistently rank benefits, including retirement benefits, among the top five contributors to job satisfaction and as a key consideration in accepting a job.1 It is not surprising, then, that more than 90 percent of companies with 500 or more employees offer retirement plans. The five largest hotel companies in the U.S. have over $10 billion in assets under management in their retirement plans, making these plans a key component in retirement investment decisions.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsRequired Publisher Statement: © Cornell University. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
dc.subjecthospitality firms
dc.subjectretirement plans
dc.subjectportfolio management
dc.subjectpension funds
dc.titleShort-term Trading in Long-term Funds: Implications for Financial Managers
dc.typearticle
dc.description.legacydownloadsMoulton_2016_Short_term_trading.pdf: 320 downloads, before Aug. 1, 2020.
local.authorAffiliationMoulton, Pamela: pm388@cornell.edu Cornell University School of Hotel Administration


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