Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Kevin William
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-10T20:24:53Z
dc.date.available2020-08-10T20:24:53Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.otherOBrien_cornellgrad_0058F_11798
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:11798
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/70484
dc.description118 pages
dc.description.abstractSoft robotic systems are inherently safe for human interaction and are able to perform useful tasks such as grasping or locomotion. Reliably producing the complex, monolithic, 3D structures necessary in these systems remains a challenge due to limitations in the available manufacturing methods. Historically, these systems have been made with molding, casting, stamping, and other techniques. Unfortunately, these methods are largely limited to 2D and thus inhibit the robots' potential complexity. Recent advances in 3D printing of elastomers and other low-modulus materials has enabled us to manufacture soft structures that were not obtainable just 5 years ago. Taking advantage of this leap in manufacturing capability, my work explores the improvements to soft actuators, sensors, and integrated robotic systems afforded by 3D printing. In the realm of soft actuators, I first describe the development of an entirely 3D printed continuously variable transmission which increases the output force of tendon-driven actuators by up to 3X without negatively impacting its unloaded speed. Additionally, I describe the development and characterization of a soft limb which uses tendon-routing variations to achieve complex motions and improved stiffness profiles. Further, I describe the development of haptic sensors by directly printing them using Direct Ink Writing, and by printing their structure for integration with off-the-shelf and molded components. Finally, I discuss the integration of these soft sensors and actuators in the development of two 3D-printed soft robotic systems: i) a hand which uses its reflexes to catch a ball and crush a can, ii) a crawling robot which demonstrates improved locomotion due to complex tendon routing schemes, and iii) an optoelectronically innervated soft prosthetic hand which can detect softness and shape.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subject3D Printing
dc.subjectCompliant Mechanisms
dc.subjectProsthetics
dc.subjectSoft Robotics
dc.subjectSoft Sensors
dc.titleAdditive Manufacturing of Compliant Mechanisms and Stretchable Sensors for Sensation, Grasping, and Locomotion in Soft Robotic Systems
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Mechanical Engineering
dc.contributor.chairShepherd, Robert F.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPetersen, Kirstin H.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKress-Gazit, Hadas
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/1py6-mg37


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International

Statistics