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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Haotian
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-10T20:08:04Z
dc.date.available2020-08-10T20:08:04Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.otherZhang_cornell_0058O_10944
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornell:10944
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/70321
dc.description21 pages
dc.description.abstractToday, we are living in an era of image-reading. Our lives are inundated with a lot of superficial characteristics, such as imaged information media, scientific, and technical image carriers. We have reached an era with divergent means and forms of representations. The emergence of the Internet of things led to the favor of virtual information over verbal information. Reading a diagram, line drawing or rendering is far more compelling than a text-based explanation on many occasions. From a macro point of view, the image reading era refers to the image society and visual culture, but in architecture, image is more than just the representation. We can personally feel that the “image” has infiltrated into every aspect of our industry. To allow effective and fair use of the image-reading period, and to avoid its limitations, my studio works focused on the investigation of the way the technical image is produced in Architectural design. The traditional ways of architectural designing, manufacturing, and communicating is undertaking an imperceptible shift with the development of computerization and informationization. It is crucial for us younger generations of architects to learn and examine these technical tools. Thus, based on the type and scale of technical methods, the discussion will be broken down into three chapters that demonstrate how the contemporary application of technology is affecting our design and thinking process. The first chapter talks about body and human scale, the image of weaving created by robotics in bio-fabrication; the second Chapter talks about at the building and street scale, how can we use Virtual Reality as a technical image tool to change our approaches to urban designing and planning. The last Chapter expands the scale into using GIS data in urban landscape design. How can the GIS data or mapping be understood as the technical image.
dc.titleThrough Technical Images
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitecture
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameM.S., Architecture
dc.contributor.chairWarke, Val
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMergold, Aleksandr
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/2sta-4r55


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