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dc.contributor.authorWong, Michelle Y.
dc.contributor.authorRathod, Sagar D.
dc.contributor.authorHowarth, Robert W.
dc.contributor.authorMarino, Roxanne
dc.contributor.authorAlastuey, Andres
dc.contributor.authorArtaxo, Paulo
dc.contributor.authorBarraza, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorBeddow, D.C.S.
dc.contributor.authorBond, Tami
dc.contributor.authorChellam, Shankar
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yu-Cheng
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ying
dc.contributor.authorChien, Chia-Te
dc.contributor.authorCohen, David D.
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, David
dc.contributor.authorDongarra, Gaetano
dc.contributor.authorGomez, Dario
dc.contributor.authorHand, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, R.M.
dc.contributor.authorHopke, Philip
dc.contributor.authorHueglin, Christoph
dc.contributor.authorHusain, Liaquat
dc.contributor.authorKuang, Yuan-wen
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Fabrice
dc.contributor.authorLiang, James
dc.contributor.authorLi, Longleino
dc.contributor.authorLosno, Remi
dc.contributor.authorMaenhaut, Willy
dc.contributor.authorMilando, Chad
dc.contributor.authorMonteiro, Maria Inês Couto
dc.contributor.authorMorera Gómez, Yasser
dc.contributor.authorPaytan, Adina
dc.contributor.authorProspero, Joesph S.
dc.contributor.authorQuerol, Xavier
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Sergio
dc.contributor.authorSmichowski, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorVarrica, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Yi-hua
dc.contributor.authorXu, Yangjunjie
dc.contributor.authorMahowald, Natalie M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-10T18:42:13Z
dc.date.available2020-07-10T18:42:13Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/70169
dc.description.abstractMolybdenum (Mo) is an essential trace element that is, important for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as it is required for biological nitrogen fixation and uptake. Mo is carried in particles to the atmosphere from sources such as desert dust, sea spray, and volcanoes resulting in losses and sources to different ecosystems. Atmospheric Mo deposition is essential on long time scales for soils which have lost Mo due to soil weathering, with consequences for nitrogen cycling. Anthropogenic changes to the Mo cycle from combustion, motor vehicles, and agricultural dust, are likely to be large, and have more than doubled sources of Mo to the atmosphere. Locally, anthropogenic changes to Mo in industrialized regions can represent a 100‐fold increase in deposition, and may affect nitrogen cycling in nitrogen‐limited ecosystems. This dataset supports these findings.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe acknowledge the Atkinson Center for funding for this project, and NSF CCF-1522054.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyWong, M. Y., Rathod, S. D., Marino, R., Li, L., Howarth, R. W., Alastuey, A., et al. (2021). Anthropogenic perturbations to the atmospheric molybdenum cycle. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 35, e2020GB006787. https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GB006787
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectAtmospheric Mo
dc.subjectBiogeochemistry
dc.subjectAerosols
dc.titleData from: Anthropogenic Perturbations to the Atmospheric Molybdenum Cycleen_US
dc.typedataseten_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyurihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2020GB006787
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/nzhv-4579


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