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dc.contributor.authorPerez Fodich, Alida
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-23T18:02:14Z
dc.date.available2020-07-17T06:00:34Z
dc.date.issued2019-12
dc.identifier.otherPerezFodich_cornellgrad_0058F_11804
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:11804
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/70068
dc.description248 pages
dc.description.abstractChemical weathering produces soils and the necessary nutrients for ecosystems; additionally, it regulates the climate at geologic timescales. Therefore, weathering is a fundamental process for the Earth’s living layer: the Critical Zone. Despite the limited areal extent of volcanic regions, weathering of volcanic rocks contributes to these processes disproportionally due to their high reactivity. The Island of Hawaii constitutes a natural laboratory to evaluate chemical weathering reactions in volcanic terrains. In this dissertation, I contribute to the understanding of chemical reactions driving intense and fast weathering of Hawaiian basalts using a reactive transport model that incorporates organic acids and soil respiration. I have also investigated the chemical processes involved in incipient weathering of Hawaiian basalts by analyzing the distribution of major and trace elements in spheroidal saprolite samples. Further on, I provide insights into the effects of weathering on runoff-to-groundwater partitioning and the landscape evolution of the Island of Hawaii by modeling watershed-scale hydrologic parameters on catchments affected by different degrees of weathering. Finally, I developed an equilibrium fractionation model for Ge and Si in kaolinite that can be implemented on different geochemical models of silicate weathering.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
dc.subjectCritical Zone
dc.subjectGe/Si ratios
dc.subjectHawaii
dc.subjectReactive Transport
dc.subjectRunoff partitioning
dc.subjectWeathering
dc.titleUnderstanding volcanic weathering processes through geochemical modeling, trace elements and hydrology
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineGeological Sciences
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Geological Sciences
dc.contributor.chairDerry, Louis A.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMartinez, Carmen Enid
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWalter, Todd
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/429s-0g63


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