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dc.contributor.authorDemetres, Michelle R
dc.contributor.authorWright, Drew N
dc.contributor.authorDeRosa, Antonio P
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-13T21:27:41Z
dc.date.available2020-01-13T21:27:41Z
dc.date.issued2020-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/69573
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim of this exploratory study was to assess personal, work-related, and client-related burnout among information professionals who support systematic review (SR) work. Methods: The Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, a validated tool for assessing burnout, was administered to information professionals who support SR work. A broad range of health sciences or medical librarians and information professionals were targeted via professional email discussion lists and news outlets. Questionnaire responses were captured electronically using Qualtrics Survey Software and quantitatively analyzed. Results: Respondents experienced an average personal burnout score of 48.6, work-related score of 46.4, and client-related score of 32.5 out of 100. Respondents who reported spending >80% of their job duties on SR work had significantly lower personal burnout scores than those who reported spending <10% of their job duties on SR work (average, 31.5 versus 50.9, respectively). Also, respondents who reported using an SR support tool had significantly lower personal burnout scores than those who reported sometimes using a tool (average, 43.7 versus 54.7, respectively). Conclusion: The results suggest that information professionals who dedicate more time to SR work or who consistently use an SR support tool experience less burnout. This study provides groundwork for further investigation with the aim of developing approaches to prevent or combat SR-related burnout among information professionals.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of the Medical Library Associationen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectCopenhagen Burnout Inventoryen_US
dc.subjectSystematic Reviewsen_US
dc.subjectBurnouten_US
dc.subjectMedical Librariansen_US
dc.titleBurnout among medical and health sciences information professionals who support systematic reviews: an exploratory studyen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.5195/jmla.2020.665en_US


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