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dc.contributor.authorVemulapati, Sasank
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T16:49:21Z
dc.date.available2019-10-15T16:49:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-30
dc.identifier.otherVemulapati_cornellgrad_0058F_11695
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:11695
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 11050639
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/67655
dc.description.abstractThe global healthcare landscape is experiencing a shift with an increasing demand for decentralized testing. Diagnostic testing is moving from the benchtop to the bedside and there is a need for translational medical tools to help usher in the generation of personalized medicine. Point-of-care medical devices have become a powerful tool to help address this growing need and can help deliver high-quality diagnostic testing at lower costs and greater convenience in comparison to conventional laboratory techniques. Point-of-care devices have also emerged as a suitable platform for use in resource limited settings where access to state-of-the-art medical equipment is scarce. In this dissertation, I detail the design and development of three unique biomedical technologies: Nutriphone, H.E.R.M.E.S and cAST. These technologies were created and developed with the specific intention of advancing diagnostic testing at the point-of-care with extended application for use in resource-limited environments. While there are similar themes in the design philosophy of the three technologies, they address entirely different areas of interest; Nutriphone enables rapid assessment of Vitamin D deficiencies, H.E.R.M.E.S enables quick and efficient pre-diagnostic sample preparation for blood-based testing and cAST offers accelerated assessment of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial organisms. I will highlight the underlying technical principles and the key innovations that we were able to demonstrate along with initial clinical results that make them promising platforms worthy of further development.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDesign
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.subjectMechanical engineering
dc.titleEngineering Biomedical Technologies for the Developing World
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh.D., Mechanical Engineering
dc.contributor.chairErickson, David
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMehta, Saurabh
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSingh, Ankur
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/ceg0-tz36


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