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dc.contributor.authorEaton, Tayler
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T15:28:16Z
dc.date.available2019-10-15T15:28:16Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-30
dc.identifier.otherEaton_cornell_0058O_10509
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornell:10509
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 11050203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/67222
dc.description.abstractThe survival encoding effect, or “adaptive memory”, shows a memory advantage to information processed in the context of one’s own survival. The self-reference effect, which also confers a memory advantage but to information processed in reference to the self, does not grant an advantage to memory recall as great as the survival encoding effect. The present study examines how each of these effects operates across stimuli type, and whether the survival encoding effect operates functionally as a distinct encoding process or as an augmented form of self-reference. Survival encoding and self-referential paradigms were adapted to examine the same concrete noun words in Study 1 (n = 60) and the same abstract trait words in Study 2 (n = 61), parsing out words related to self and other for each encoding process. A within-subjects design was used across five encoding conditions: survival-self, survival-other, self-reference, other-reference, and pleasantness (acting as a deep encoding comparison). In Study 1, significant main effects were found for person (self vs. other) and strategy (survival-relevance vs. self-relevance). In Study 2, a significant main effect was found for person but not strategy. Across both studies, the self-other memory distinction was abolished in the survival condition. These results provide evidence that “adaptive memory” provides a unique and stimuli-specific memory advantage and cannot be understood as an enhanced self-reference effect. Implications for the role of each encoding condition in maladaptive memory are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectadaptive memory
dc.subjectemotional memory
dc.subjectself-reference
dc.subjectsurvival encoding
dc.subjectEpisodic Memory
dc.titleSURVIVAL OF THE SELF: EXAMINATIONS OF THE ROLE OF SELF-REFERENCE IN ADAPTIVE MEMORY
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Development
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameM.A., Human Development
dc.contributor.chairAnderson, Adam K.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBrainerd, Charles
dc.contributor.committeeMemberOng, Anthony D.
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/at9k-k415


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