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dc.contributor.authorCook-Patton, Susan C.
dc.contributor.authorAgrawal, Anurag A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-02T13:06:47Z
dc.date.available2019-08-02T13:06:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/66751
dc.description.abstractAlthough exotic plants comprise a substantial portion of floristic biodiversity, their contributions to community and ecosystem processes are not well understood. We manipulated plant species richness in old?field communities to compare the impacts of native vs. exotic species on plant biomass, seed production, and arthropod community structure. Plants within diverse communities, regardless of whether they were native or exotic, had higher biomass and seed production than in monocultures and displayed positive complementarity. Increasing native or exotic plant richness also enhanced the richness of arthropods on plants, but exotics attracted fewer arthropod species for a given arthropod abundance than did natives. Additionally, when exotic and native plants grew together, exotics suppressed seed production of native species. Thus, exotic plants appear to contribute positively to some biodiversity functions, but may impact native communities over longer time frames by reducing native seed production and recruiting fewer arthropod species.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a grant from Cornell’s IGERT in Biogeochemistry and Environmental Biocomplexity to S. C. Cook-Patton and NSF-DEB 1118783 to A. A. Agrawal.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEcological Society of America
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEcology
dc.relation.hasversionCook-Patton, S. C., & Agrawal, A. A. (2014). Exotic plants contribute positively to biodiversity functions but reduce native seed production and arthropod richness. Ecology, 95(6), 1642–1650.
dc.subjectarthropod richness
dc.subjectbiodiversity
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectDryden, New York, USA
dc.subjectexotic plants
dc.subjectinvasion
dc.subjectmono- vs. polyculture
dc.subjectnative plants
dc.subjectold-field habitat
dc.subjectplant-insect interactions
dc.subjectseed production
dc.titleExotic plants contribute positively to biodiversity functions but reduce native seed production and arthropod richness
dc.typearticle
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/60291
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1890/13-0782.1


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