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dc.contributor.authorSu, Yulong
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-16T16:26:45Z
dc.date.available2019-07-16T16:26:45Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/66703
dc.descriptionSpring 2019 CIPA Capstone Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractIn consultation with the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), a CIPA Capstone student researched trends in pedestrian fatalities from 2008-2017 using the Fatality Analysis Reporting System. Research reflected a significant increase in these fatalities and potential factors that may be connected to trends such as an increase in sports utility vehicles, lighting conditions, alcohol & drug use while driving and cell phone usage. The report includes a cross-country comparison of Japan and the United States, and examines factors that led to reversal of pedestrian fatalities trends in Japan. The report finds that Japan initiated a national campaign known as the “traffic war” which included policy changes and funding across several agencies, which may provide guidance to the U.S. policymakers. Additionally, the project outlined and analyzed the components and differences between the U.S. and Japan’s New Car Assessment Program (NCAP). The report finds that the U.S. does not include a pedestrian safety factor as does Japan in their overall score and made recommendations for incorporating this factor. Research also explored new technologies for pedestrian safety and made suggestions for incorporating these features into overall NCAP scores.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectcapstoneen_US
dc.subjectresearchen_US
dc.subjecttransportationen_US
dc.subjectpolicyen_US
dc.subjectfederal governmenten_US
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Pedestrian Fatalities and New Car Assessment Programs in the U.S. and Japanen_US
dc.typereporten_US


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