Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorConstable, Robert L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-23T17:10:53Z
dc.date.available2007-04-23T17:10:53Z
dc.date.issued1985-09en_US
dc.identifier.citationhttp://techreports.library.cornell.edu:8081/Dienst/UI/1.0/Display/cul.cs/TR85-701en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/6541
dc.description.abstractType theory has become central to computer science because it deals with fundamental issues in programming languages, in programming methodology and specification languages, in automatic theorem proving and programming logic, in natural language semantics and in the foundations of intelligent systems. At Cornell we have been studying a logical theory of types which has influenced the design of programming languages and has become the basis of an implemented program development system. This theory answers many basic questions about data types. Here we discuss three general questions about this theory: how logical types relate to domains, how they relate to sets, how they organize programming logics and the intelligent systems built around them. These issues are each of independent value, but they also arise naturally as part of a program to provide a computationally meaningful foundation to computing theory.en_US
dc.format.extent1589392 bytes
dc.format.extent371647 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/postscript
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCornell Universityen_US
dc.subjectcomputer scienceen_US
dc.subjecttechnical reporten_US
dc.titleInvestigations of Type Theory in Programming Logics and Intelligent Systemsen_US
dc.typetechnical reporten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics