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dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Fred B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-23T16:48:53Z
dc.date.available2007-04-23T16:48:53Z
dc.date.issued1983-08en_US
dc.identifier.citationhttp://techreports.library.cornell.edu:8081/Dienst/UI/1.0/Display/cul.cs/TR83-569en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/6409
dc.description.abstractA fail-stop processor halts instead of performing an erroneous state transformation that might be visible to other processors, can detect whether another fail-stop processor has halted (due to a failure), and has a predefined portion of its storage that is unaffected by failures and accessible to any other fail-stop processor. Fail-stop processors can simplify construction of fault-tolerant computing systems. In this paper, the problem of approximating fail-stop processors is compared with the state machine approach, another general paradigm for constructing fault-tolerant systems.en_US
dc.format.extent1282903 bytes
dc.format.extent293724 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/postscript
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCornell Universityen_US
dc.subjectcomputer scienceen_US
dc.subjecttechnical reporten_US
dc.titleByzantine Generals In Action: Implementing Fail-Stop Processorsen_US
dc.typetechnical reporten_US


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