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dc.contributor.authorOffice of  Marketing and Communications. Media Relations
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-03T20:38:38Z
dc.date.available2019-01-03T20:38:38Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-27
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/60746
dc.description.abstractThis news item is about: In 2003, newly minted MD Kristy Richards was preparing to move to Houston, Texas, to start a fellowship in oncology. At a friend's wedding, she got talking with a fellow guest from Houston, a veterinarian who treated dogs with cancer. Richards was incredulous. “You give chemo to dogs?” she recalls asking. Yes, veterinarians do give chemotherapy to dogs. In the case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, for example, the pooches get a cocktail of four drugs known by the initials CHOP, a mainstay of first-line chemotherapy in humans.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectCornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine -- Periodicals.
dc.subjectRichards, Kristy
dc.title2018 CVM News: How dogs are teaching researchers new tricks for treating cancer
dc.typearticle


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