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dc.contributor.authorHestrin, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorTorres-Rojas, Dorisel
dc.contributor.authorDynes, James J
dc.contributor.authorHook, James M
dc.contributor.authorRegier, Tom Z
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Adam W
dc.contributor.authorSmernik, Ronald J
dc.contributor.authorLehmann, Johannes
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-13T21:33:09Z
dc.date.available2018-12-13T21:33:09Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/60623
dc.description.abstractFire-derived organic matter is present in the Earth’s soil, sediment, atmosphere, and water. We investigated interactions of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) with ammonia (NH3) gas, which makes up much of the Earth’s reactive nitrogen (N) pool. Here we show that PyOM’s NH3 retention capacity under ambient conditions can exceed 180 mg N g-1 PyOM carbon, resulting in a material with a higher N content than any unprocessed plant material and most animal manures. As PyOM is weathered, NH3 retention increases 4-fold, with more than half of the N retained through chemisorption rather than physisorption. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveal that a variety of covalent bonds form between NH3-N and PyOM, more than 10% of which may be contained in heterocyclic structures. We estimate that through these mechanisms soil PyOM stocks could retain more than 600-fold annual NH3 emissions from agriculture, and conclude that PyOM could exert an important and unaccounted-for control on global N cycling. This dataset supports the findings of this study.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported in part by Cornell University's David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, the Towards Sustainability Foundation, the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future Impact through Innovation Fund, NSF BREAD Program (IOS-0965336) and the McKnight Foundation. Some of the research described in this paper was performed at the Canadian Light Source Inc., which is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the National Research Council Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Province of Saskatchewan, Western Economic Diversification Canada, and the University of Saskatchewan. This work also made use of the Cornell Center for Materials Research Shared Facilities which are supported through the NSF MRSEC program (DMR-1120296). The Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre at the University of New South Wales is acknowledged for access to solid state NMR spectrometers funded through Australian Research Council LIEF LE0989541. R.H. acknowledges support from the NSF IGERT Program (DGE-0903371 and DGE-1069193) and the NSF GRFP (DGE-1144153). Special thanks to Akio Enders, Kelly Hanley, and Cornell University Stable Isotope Laboratory staff for their help with sample analysis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectammoniaen_US
dc.subjectnitrogenen_US
dc.subjectpyrogenic organic matteren_US
dc.subjectbiocharen_US
dc.titleData from: Fire-derived organic matter retains ammonia through covalent bond formationen_US
dc.typedataseten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X0B7-PX55


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