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dc.contributor.authorNielsen-Palacios, Christian Ricardo
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-23T13:33:43Z
dc.date.available2018-10-23T13:33:43Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-30
dc.identifier.otherNielsenPalacios_cornell_0058O_10315
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornell:10315
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 10489678
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59582
dc.description.abstractCornell University’s School of Architecture, the second oldest in the United States, enjoyed for many years a reputation as a quintessential "French" school, based on the teaching methods of the École de Beaux Arts in Paris. Its students and alumni did very well in design competitions, and went on to successful careers all over the country. When the author attended architecture school in Caracas, the majority of the faculty were Cornell alumni from the 50s. Their focus was on modernism, and when they reminisced about Cornell they talked mostly about what they learned studying Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe and Gropius, among others. For this thesis the author reviewed documents in the university’s archives and corresponded with alumni of the era, in order to look at the transitional period between those two phases in the life of the Cornell school.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectteaching
dc.subjectBeaux Arts
dc.subjectEducation history
dc.subjectarchitecture
dc.subjectCornell
dc.titleARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION AT CORNELL: 1928-1950 BETWEEN MODERNISM AND BEAUX-ARTS
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitecture
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameM.A., Architecture
dc.contributor.chairWoods, Mary Norman
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWarke, Val Kevin
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X4JD4V07


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