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dc.contributor.authorSohn, Joon Woo
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-23T13:22:21Z
dc.date.available2018-10-23T13:22:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-30
dc.identifier.otherSOHN_cornellgrad_0058F_10808
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:10808
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 10489465
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59380
dc.description.abstractWhile recent research has devoted much attention to the effect of local sociopolitical contexts on organizations, how society-wide institutional pressures—such as federal policies—affect the relationship between the two has rarely been discussed by organizational scholars. This is an important question because local and society-wide institutional environments concurrently shape organizational behavior. Building on the theory of political mediation and an institutional perspective, we argue that state-level sociopolitical influences on organizations will depend on the broader regulatory context at the federal level. We use data on coal-fired facilities’ sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions to address the question of when formal and informal local (state-level) sociopolitical contexts directly influence organizations’ environmental performance. Our results show that when the national-level Acid Rain Program (ARP) was regarded as an effective regulation for controlling SO2 emissions (2003–2009), coal-fired facilities, as well as local government officials, key stakeholders, and social movement organizations (SMOs), attended to the implementation of the federal law. As a consequence, local sociopolitical contexts had a negligible effect on SO2 emissions by individual facilities. However, when stakeholders questioned the effectiveness of the ARP (2010–2011), the direct impact of SMOs and other sociopolitical contexts at the state level on facilities’ emissions increased. From an institutional perspective, our results imply that local sociopolitical contexts are themselves embedded within the larger, society-wide, institutional environment, and that evaluating the direct influence of local sociopolitical pressures on organizations thus requires a more dynamic approach that includes consideration of institutional contexts at different levels in society.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectOrganization theory
dc.subjectManagement
dc.subjectOrganizational behavior
dc.subjectAcid Rain Program
dc.subjectEnvironmental performance
dc.subjectPolitical mediation model
dc.subjectSocial movement
dc.subjectInstitutional Theory
dc.titleEXPLORING THE EFFECT OF FEDERAL AND STATE-LEVEL SOCIOPOLITICAL PRESSURES ON ORGANIZATIONS
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and Labor Relations
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Industrial and Labor Relations
dc.contributor.chairTolbert, Pamela S.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDiciccio, Thomas J.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDowell, Glen W.S.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBurton, Mary Diane
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X44Q7S6M


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