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dc.contributor.authorOffice of Communications
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-23T17:14:55Z
dc.date.available2018-08-23T17:14:55Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-26
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/58296
dc.description.abstractThis news item is about: First it was bees that were mysteriously dying. Now it's bats. Bats in hibernation Following a summer when honeybees across America began to die in great numbers, researchers are now finding thousands of sick bats in caves in New York, Vermont and Massachusetts. The deaths of bees and bats appear to be unrelated. Bat specialists from the New York State Department of Conservation (NYSDEC) have found 15 sites, up from four discovered last year, with sick bats: one in Massachusetts, two in Vermont and 12 in New York between Albany and Watertown. To help diagnose the problem, NYSDEC scientists are sending samples to Beth Buckles, assistant professor of biomedical sciences in Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectCornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine -- Periodicals.; Buckles, Elizabeth
dc.title2008 CVM News: Vet College scientists aid investigation of why bats in Northeast are mysteriously dying
dc.title.alternative2008 CVM News: Bats in Northeast mysteriously dying
dc.typearticle


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