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dc.contributor.authorKanbur, Ravi
dc.contributor.authorSquire, Lyn
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-21T17:10:27Z
dc.date.available2018-08-21T17:10:27Z
dc.date.issued1999-09-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/57971
dc.descriptionWP 1999-24 September 1999
dc.description.abstractThis paper considers the evolution ofthinking about poverty since Rowntree's classic study ofpoverty in England at the turn ofthe last century. It highlights the progressive broadening ofthe definition and measurement ofpoverty, from command over market-purchased goods (income) to other dimensions ofliving standards such as longevity, literacy and healthiness, and , most recently, to concerns with risk and vulnerability, and powerlessness and lack ofvoice. The paper argues that while there is a correlation between these different dimensions, this broadening changes significantly our thinking about strategies to reduce poverty. A broader definition expands the set ofpolicies that are relevant to the reduction of poverty. But the broadening also emphasizes that poverty reducing strategies must recognize the interactions among the policies--the impact of appropriately designed combinations will be greater than the sum ofthe individual parts.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCharles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University
dc.titleThe Evolution of Thinking About Poverty: Exploring the Interactions
dc.typearticle
dcterms.licensehttp://hdl.handle.net/1813/57595


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  • Dyson School Working Papers
    Working Papers published by the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University

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