Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSchmit, Todd M.
dc.contributor.authorVerteramo, Leslie J.
dc.contributor.authorTomek, William G.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-21T17:10:13Z
dc.date.available2018-08-21T17:10:13Z
dc.date.issued2008-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/57931
dc.descriptionWP 2007-10 Revised: August 2008
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between complete-feed prices and ingredient prices are estimated to analyze the effect of higher commodity prices on feed costs, with particular attention to the substitutability of corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS). Using an historical positive price correlation between corn and DDGS, each $1/ton increase in the price of corn increases feed costs between $0.45 and $0.59 per ton across livestock sectors. Assuming a negative long-run price correlation reduces these marginal feed costs to between $0.11 and $0.36. Overall, DDGS cost savings are relatively limited and insufficient to offset the impact of other higher-priced feedstocks.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCharles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University
dc.titleImplications of Growing Biofuels Demands on Northeast Livestock Feed Costs
dc.typearticle
dcterms.licensehttp://hdl.handle.net/1813/57595


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Dyson School Working Papers
    Working Papers published by the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University

Show simple item record

Statistics