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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Christopher B.
dc.contributor.authorSherlund, Shane M.
dc.contributor.authorAdesina, Akinwumi A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-21T17:09:46Z
dc.date.available2018-08-21T17:09:46Z
dc.date.issued2003-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/57847
dc.descriptionWP 2003-18 May 2003
dc.description.abstractLittle empirical work has quantified the transitory effects of macroeconomic shocks on farm-level production behavior. We develop a simple analytical model to explain how macroeconomic shocks might temporarily divert managerial attention, thereby affecting farm-level productivity, but perhaps to different degrees and for different durations across production units. We then successfully test hypotheses from that model using panel data bracketing massive currency devaluation in the west African nation of Cote d'Ivoire. We find a transitory increase in mean plot-level technical inefficiency among Ivorien rice producers and considerable variation in the magnitude and persistence of this effect, attributable largely to ex ante complexity of operations, and the educational attainment and off-farm employment status of the plot manager.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCharles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University
dc.titleMacroeconomic shocks, human capital and productive efficiency: Evidence from West African farmers
dc.typearticle
dcterms.licensehttp://hdl.handle.net/1813/57595


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  • Dyson School Working Papers
    Working Papers published by the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University

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