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dc.contributor.authorDasgupta, Indraneel
dc.contributor.authorKanbur, Ravi
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-21T17:09:19Z
dc.date.available2018-08-21T17:09:19Z
dc.date.issued2007-02-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/57741
dc.descriptionWP 2007-03 February 2007
dc.descriptionJEL Classification Codes: D31; D63; D74; Z13
dc.description.abstractWealthy individuals often voluntarily provide public goods that the poor also consume. Such philanthropy is commonly perceived as legitimizing one’s wealth. Governments routinely exempt the rich from taxation on grounds of their charitable expenditures. We examine the logic of this exemption. We show that, rather than reducing inequality, philanthropy may actually exacerbate absolute inequality, while leaving the change in relative inequality ambiguous. Additionally, philanthropic preferences may increase the effectiveness of policies to redistribute income, instead of weakening them. Consequently, from an egalitarian perspective, the general case for exempting the wealthy from expropriation, on grounds of their public goods contributions, appears dubious.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCharles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectPublic goods
dc.subjectInequality
dc.subjectDistribution
dc.subjectPhilanthropy
dc.subjectEgalitarianism
dc.titleShould Egalitarians Expropriate Philanthropists?
dc.typearticle
dcterms.licensehttp://hdl.handle.net/1813/57595


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  • Dyson School Working Papers
    Working Papers published by the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University

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