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dc.contributor.authorOffice of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-07T18:39:01Z
dc.date.available2018-06-07T18:39:01Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-13
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/57274
dc.description.abstractThis news item from science@CornellVet is about: It was 2003, just four years after the first known outbreak of Nipah virus occurred in Malaysia and around the time a second outbreak occurred in Bangladesh. Dr. Hector Aguilar-Carreno had ust decided to focus his research on the Nipah virus, instead of expanding on his postdoctoral lab's research on HIV. "The more I looked into the Nipah virus the more interested I became," says Aguilar-Carreno. In retrospect, he made the right choice: "We became famous for being the pioneers for studying how the Nipah virus makes its way into cells." Now an associate professor in the Department of Microbiology & Immunology at Cornell, Aguilar-Carreno continues working towards unveiling how this virus causes disease.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectCornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine -- Periodicals.
dc.subjectAguilar-Carreno, Hector
dc.subjectscience@CornellVet
dc.title2018 CVM News: Time vs swine: Working against the clock to stop the next pandemic
dc.typearticle


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