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dc.contributor.authorKrachler, Nikolaus Johannes
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-26T14:16:12Z
dc.date.available2018-04-26T14:16:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-30
dc.identifier.otherKrachler_cornell_0058O_10120
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornell:10120
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 10361459
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/56782
dc.description.abstractCommentators have often celebrated care coordination as an encompassing solution capable of reducing costs and increasing quality in US healthcare. It is unclear, however, under which conditions organizations implement high-quality work practices that are essential for achieving improved outcomes in the context of care coordination programs. My paper examines two institutional factors that improve the quality of work practices: occupational community, and regulatory intensity. I argue that the interaction of both factors produces higher quality than either would in isolation. I also demonstrate how in the absence of both factors, a prioritization of cost-effectiveness reduces the quality of work practices. To make my argument I draw on 80 semi-structured interviews, 80 documents, and 15 hours of observation in my study of three care management agencies that focus on serving low-income chronic disease patients in one of the most resource-poor communities in New York State.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectOccupational Community
dc.subjectRegulatory Intensity
dc.subjectWork Practices
dc.subjectSocial work
dc.subjectLabor relations
dc.subjectHealth care management
dc.subjectCare Coordination
dc.subjectInstitutional Theory
dc.subjectManagement Practices
dc.titleHOW INSTITUTIONAL CONDITIONS SHAPE THE QUALITY OF WORK PRACTICES: EVIDENCE FROM THREE CARE COORDINATION PROGRAMS IN NEW YORK STATE
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and Labor Relations
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameM.S., Industrial and Labor Relations
dc.contributor.chairBatt, Rosemary
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLitwin, Adam Seth
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X44X55XW


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