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dc.contributor.authorPaprocki, Kasia
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-26T14:15:58Z
dc.date.available2019-09-11T06:01:44Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-30
dc.identifier.otherPaprocki_cornellgrad_0058F_10479
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:10479
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 10361436
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/56757
dc.description.abstractIn the broadest sense, this is a study of competing imaginations of the future under climate change, and struggles over the power to shape that future. Who gets to imagine what the future will look like? What are the material implications of those imaginations? How do certain imaginations of the future become reality, while others are silenced and foreclosed? How is the power to determine the future exercised? I answer these questions through an exploration of the intersection of development and climate change adaptation in Bangladesh, and the various actors that shape and contest it. Development in Bangladesh is increasingly defined by and through an adaptation regime, a socially and historically specific configuration of power that governs the landscape of possible intervention in the face of climate change. It includes institutions of development, research, media, and science, as well as various state actors both nationally and internationally. This adaptation regime works by de-historicizing and de-politicizing the dynamics of ecological change, legitimizing new interventions by donors, policy makers, researchers, and development agencies. By marshaling significant funding, infrastructure and political capital, the adaptation regime constitutes a new form of governance over the livelihoods seen as viable in the near- and long-term future. The politics of uncertainty over whether, how, and when to adapt also enroll the scientific and research communities in activities of the regime. Strategies for pursuing “viable” futures in the time of climate change range from the promotion of saline shrimp aquaculture in former rice farming communities to plans for resettling the populations of entire geographic regions. In this dissertation, I trace the rise of this regime from its colonial antecedents to the present, investigate the range of actors that have contributed to its emergence, and examine a variety of ways in which its impacts are experienced in communities in coastal Bangladesh. I focus on three communities that have taken different paths regarding shrimp cultivation, and that have variously mobilized against it. Their experiences and struggles challenge the notion that agriculture is no longer viable in their region, and suggest new possibilities for equitable futures in rural Bangladesh and beyond.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.subjectagrarian change
dc.subjectSociology
dc.subjectGeography
dc.subjectPolitical Ecology
dc.subjectAdaptation
dc.subjectClimate change
dc.subjectBangladesh
dc.titleTHREATENING DYSTOPIAS: DEVELOPMENT POLITICS AND THE ANTICIPATION OF CLIMATE CRISIS IN BANGLADESH
dc.typedissertation or thesis
thesis.degree.disciplineDevelopment Sociology
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Development Sociology
dc.contributor.chairWolford, Wendy W.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCons, Jason
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcMichael, Philip David
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGhosh, Durba
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X4Q52MS1


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