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dc.contributor.authorThurn, Mary
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorEshenaur, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-05T18:20:54Z
dc.date.available2018-04-05T18:20:54Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/56373
dc.descriptionNYS IPM Type: Resistant Ornamental Plants Fact Sheet
dc.description.abstractThe genus Malus includes orchard apples and crabapples. They are closely related, differing mainly in fruit size. Flowering crabapples are one of the most widely grown small ornamental trees in the Northeast and Midwest. Popular in both commercial and residential landscapes for their stunning spring flower displays, there are many selections available with a wide diversity in tree size and shape, flower color, and fruit color and persistence. Crabapples are prone to several diseases, including apple scab, fire blight, powdery mildew and cedar-apple rust. The most serious fungal disease is apple scab, and susceptible cultivars may require routine preventive fungicide sprays to protect the plant. There are resistant cultivars available. However, it is important to note that there may be significant regional differences in disease resistance – a cultivar that performs well in one area may do poorly in another. There are also cultivars resistant to insect pests such as Japanese beetle, but disease resistance should be the first consideration.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNew York State Integrated Pest Management Program
dc.relation.isreplacedbyhttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/56373.2
dc.subjectAgricultural IPM
dc.subjectOrnamentals
dc.subjectTrees
dc.subjectMalus
dc.subjectCrabapple
dc.subjectResistant
dc.titleMalus
dc.typefact sheet


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