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dc.contributor.authorOffice of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T18:43:28Z
dc.date.available2018-02-05T18:43:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-26
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/55772
dc.description.abstractThis news item is about: Two local raptors made unexpected recoveries this month after exposure to common and deadly manmade toxins—lead and rodenticide. “These two cases represent extremely fortunate birds,” said Sara Childs-Sanford, chief of service at the Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Health Center. “Many, many more die in the wild without anyone knowing.” The patients, a bald eagle and a northern harrier, were found lethargic and unable to fly, each suffering from acute poisoning from different manmade contaminants that nearly cost them their lives.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectCornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine -- Periodicals.
dc.subjectChilds-Sanford, Sara
dc.subjectCordova, Melanie Greaver
dc.title2018 CVM News: Collateral damage: Manmade toxins threaten raptors
dc.typearticle


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