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dc.contributor.authorBraddock, Jeremy
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-11T16:07:33Z
dc.date.available2017-12-11T16:07:33Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-27
dc.identifier.issn2333-0309
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/55003
dc.description.abstractA short article on how the Firesign Theater, during the period of their contract with Columbia Records (1967-75), pioneered a new form of sound-based literary writing using the emerging technologies of multitrack recording, from within the heart of the entertainment industry in Los Angeles. Argues that, compared to the terms Neil Verma coins to describe radio work of the 1940s — e.g. Norman Corwin's kaleidosonic style — the Firesign Theatre used the multitrack system to devise non-Euclidian "analytic space" within their narratives. This new technique was devised in order to represent the new saturation of media, and its intimate relation to the Vietnam War.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSounding Out!en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsound studies, comedy, literatureen_US
dc.titleThe Firesign Theatre's Wax Poetics: Overdub, Dissonance, and Narrative in the Age of Nixonen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.doihttps://soundstudiesblog.com/2017/11/27/the-firesign-theatres-wax-poetics-how-a-narrative-takes-shape-in-auditory-dissonance-and-experimentation/en_US


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