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dc.contributor.authorOffice of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T20:46:47Z
dc.date.available2017-07-10T20:46:47Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-14
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51939
dc.description.abstractThe news item from the Cornell Chronicle is about: Canine parvovirus, or CPV, emerged as a deadly threat to dogs in the late 1970s, most likely the result of the direct transfer of feline panleukopenia or a similar virus from domesticated cats. CPV has since spread to wild forest-dwelling animals, including raccoons, and the transfer of the virus from domesticated to wild carnivores has been something of a mystery.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectCornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine -- Periodicals.
dc.subjectParrish, Colin
dc.subjectFleischman, Tom
dc.subjectCornell Chronicle
dc.title2016 CVM News: Parrish: Surface mutation lets parvovirus jump to other species
dc.title.alternativeSurface mutation lets canine parvovirus jump to other species
dc.typearticle


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