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dc.contributor.authorOffice of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T18:36:11Z
dc.date.available2017-07-10T18:36:11Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-04
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51884
dc.description.abstractThis news item from the Cornell Chronicle is about: Snot otter. Devil dog. Mud devil. The eastern hellbender – a freshwater salamander that can grow to more than two feet long – has a collection of folksy aliases and oversized charisma. The giant amphibians are native to New York and other eastern states, but today you’d be lucky to see one in the wild. Over the past decade, hellbenders have nearly disappeared from New York watersheds.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectCornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine -- Periodicals.
dc.subjectBunting, Elizabeth
dc.subjectEnglund, Sheri
dc.subjectCornell Chronicle
dc.title2014 CVM News: Research team is hell-bent on saving hellbenders
dc.typearticle


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