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dc.contributor.authorOffice of Marketing and Communications. Media Relations
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T18:36:09Z
dc.date.available2017-07-10T18:36:09Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-17
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51876
dc.description.abstractThis news item from the Cornell Chronicle is about: When parasitic worms invade muscle tissue, white blood cells called eosinophils rush to the scene. A study published in the Journal of Immunology this month reveals that these cells actually start a chain reaction that stops the body from launching a chemical attack on the worm, enabling the parasite to make a home within the muscle.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine
dc.subjectCornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine -- Periodicals.
dc.subjectAppleton, Judith
dc.subjectHuang, Lu
dc.subjectBuckley, Merry R.
dc.subjectCornell Chronicle
dc.title2014 CVM News: Invading worms cause the body to shut down defenses
dc.typearticle


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