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dc.contributor.authorManky Bonilla, Walter Omar ,
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-07T12:48:29Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-30
dc.identifier.otherMankyBonilla_cornellgrad_0058F_10284
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/cornellgrad:10284
dc.identifier.otherbibid: 9948786
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/51563
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation compares subcontracted workers’ organizations in Chile and Peru. While these countries share several institutional features, and labor organizations in both countries face similar employer strategies, the workers’ responses have been divergent. Between 2000 and 2015, Chilean miners formed a robust and militant national union that coordinated successful countrywide strategies. In Peru, on the other hand, workers organized at a more decentralized local level, and, despite high levels of mobilization, failed to create a stable labor organization. Drawing on union revitalization, economic geography, and social movement literatures, along with eighteen months of fieldwork in several mining camps of each county, I account for these responses. Specifically, I argue that traditional explanatory variables, such as bargaining structure, industry characteristics, and labor legislation do not account for these varying strategies. Rather, my explanation focuses on: (a) differences in how social reproduction is organized in each country and (b) labor’s links to political activists. Peruvian workers use their sense of a peasant identity, one rooted in the collective land tenure system, to organize themselves, whereas Chilean workers, a very mobile workforce with no communal access to the land, organize in more traditional working-class unions. Regarding union-activist connections, leftist Chilean organizations helped unions to develop a class-based identity, providing networks that forged collaboration amongst miners at the national level. In contrast, Peruvian miners avoided “doing politics,” given the country’s recent history of political violence.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectChile
dc.subjectLabor relations
dc.subjectPeru
dc.subjectSociology
dc.subjectMining
dc.titleRE-SCALING STRATEGIES: THE TRANSFORMATION OF LABOR DYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL MINING INDUSTRY
dc.typedissertation or thesis
dc.description.embargo2021-06-08
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and Labor Relations
thesis.degree.grantorCornell University
thesis.degree.levelDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePh. D., Industrial and Labor Relations
dc.contributor.chairKuruvilla, Sarosh
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFriedman, Eli
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCook, Maria
dcterms.licensehttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/59810
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7298/X4RB72RW


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