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dc.contributor.authorWebb, Susan
dc.contributor.authorShelton, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-04T19:24:19Z
dc.date.available2007-01-04T19:24:19Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1813/5153
dc.description.abstractThe imported cabbageworm (ICW), Artogeia rapae (L.) is one of New York's most serious pests of cabbage; studies related to its control are an important component of our research program. For instance, we have experimented with the use of a granulosis virus for management of ICW, and our laboratory has an ongoing program screening cole crops for resistance to several lepidopteran species including ICW. Because these studies all require a constant supply of disease-free eggs and larvae, we continuously rear the insects in the laboratory. Fortunately, although the ICW is a crucifer specialist, it can be reared on a wheat germ-based diet. The major requirements for successful culture are: (1) supplemental lighting in the greenhouse to provide conditions suitable for mating and oviposition, and (2) strict attention to measures designed to prevent disease in the population, and to prevent microbial contamination of the diet.en_US
dc.format.extent711802 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNew York State Agricultural Experiment Stationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNew York's Food and Life Sciences Bulletinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries122en_US
dc.subjectrearing cabbagewormen_US
dc.subjectimported cabbageworm in laboratoryen_US
dc.titleLaboratory Rearing of the Imported Cabbagewormen_US
dc.typeperiodicalen_US


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  • Food and Life Sciences Bulletin
    New York's Food and Life Sciences (FLS) Bulletin reports new developments in fruit and vegetable breeding, performance, diseases, and integrated pest management. It is of interest to researchers and the public.

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